Art Culture > Travel top 10 Italy’s Most faboulous places on Google Street View Date posted: November 30, 2013

Travel top 10 Italy’s
Most faboulous places
on Google Street View

Top 10 best Italian places to travel on Google Street View

How many times did you dream about visiting Venice, Rome, Florence and the Amalfi Coast? Well, turns out you actually can do that in a blink of eye thanks to Google virtual tours. Swide tells you how…

Ah, the romance of Venice and the colors of the Amalfi Coast: who hasn’t dreamed of a tour of whole Italy among monuments, alleys and landscapes? If you are short of time, though, worry not: Google has it all figured out for us and we can actually travel around the BelPaese with a click (or two). It all started with beautiful Venice added to Google Street View  and then  it was the turn ofthe Catacombs of Priscilla unveiled by Vatican both in real life and on Google Street View last week after 15 years of restoration. Here are the top 10 places you should visit with Google View: it will be like you are (almost) there:

Venezia

It is now finally possible to wonder canals and bridges from your own computer, and even enjoying Piazza San Marco.


Visualizzazione ingrandita della mappa

Milan Duomo

One of the most beautiful Gothic Cathedral worldwide, Duomo took almost six centuries to be completed. The fifth largest Cathedral in the world, it is a masterpiece that involved over 30 architects and engeneers. Take a look at the several work of art contained in it and at its structure thanks to Google view.


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Catacombe di Priscilla

Revealed on Tuesday, the Priscilla catacombs – the place where Christians worshipped and buried their loved ones – date back nearly 2,000 years reopened to the public after five years of work of restoration done through lasers that cleaned up the religious frescoes on the walls. As a nice addition to the presentation to the public after such a long time, the Vatican released a virtual tour of them thanks to Google view.


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Colosseum

Also known as Flavian Amphitheatre, as it was built under three emperors of the Flavian dynasty this elliptical structure was used for gladiators contests and public shows like sea battles (it was filled with water on those occasions), animal hunts and so on. It ias an iconic symbol of the Imperial Rome and you can see it in details from home thanks to Google.


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Florence

The capital city of Tuscany Region, Florence is filled with history and culture. Visit it through Google view, from the Duomo to the Uffizi building vrtually walking on the Arno bridge. Isn’t a bit like being there?


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Leaning tower of Pisa

The tower that unintendendently tilts to one side is one of the most popular views of Italy. Located in Piazza dei Miracoli (Pisa’s Cathedral Square), the monument began to sink after construction had progressed to the second floor in 1178.


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Pompei

One of the most magical places on Earth, Pompei during the summer (although the season is still controversial) of 79 a.C. was submerged by a rain of ashes and lapillus that left the city nowadays how it was at the moment of the vulcanic explosion.


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Amalfi Coast – Positano

Positano, on the Amalfi Coast (Campania), especially during winter, makes you dream of summer, of warmth, of beauty, smiles and great food. So why not doing so while strolling the town with a click of your mouse?


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Eolie Islands 

Sicily deserves a trip on its own to Italy, so muchi s the density of beauty and history to be found there. If you are really too busy to organize one, try to  please yourself by having a look at one of the highlights of this Region, The Eolie Islands.


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The Royal Palace of Caserta

The Versailles of Italy, the Reggia is a former royal residence in Caserta, South Italy, constructed for the Bourbon kings of Naples. The construction begun in 1752 by architect Luigi Vanvitelli. To really understand the grandeur of it, travel through it thanks to Google…


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With contribution by Alessia Gargiulo

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