Art Culture > Literature > Find the Inferno Of Dan Brown in Florence Date posted: May 26, 2013

Find the Inferno Of Dan Brown in Florence

Dan Brown Inferno Locations

Dan Brown is back with his new book Inferno. Want to get an insiders look at the locations mentioned? Well, fan or not, here is a guide to what you need to know, focusing on Florence, Italy.

Sparking controversy once again, Dan Brown’s ‘Inferno’ is insulting various nations around the world and getting people all het up over his representation of well-loved cities and also important figures in history (I assume you’ve heard about him citing the Philippines capital Manila as ‘The Gates of Hell‘?) And what would be a Dan Brown novel without good ol’ Italia starring as a majority of the story’s setting? Well, Florence takes centre stage in his latest novel and Italian magazine Panorama found 5 of the locations mentioned in the book and Swide decided it was only right to share the locations mentioned with you.

1. Via dei Castellani

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‘The Shadow’ character is first located in Florence, on the north riverbank of river Arno, near the Ponte Vecchio. Turn left towards the north and leave the riverbank. Skip to Piazza dei Giudici, where you’ll find Palazzo Castellani that ,during the time of Dante, was called Castello d’Altafronte and today is home to the museum dedicated to Galileo. It is here that ‘The Shadow’ hides in the shade of the Uffizi. And then…

2. La Badia Fiorentina in via del Proconsolo

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From Via dei Castellani, ‘The Shadow’ takes us on a walk abound the historic centre of Florence. From Via dei Castellani, we find ourselves on Piazza San Firenze. To our left stands the beautiful palace Gondi. To our right, the baroque houses stand out along with the Court and Church of St. Philip Blacks. ‘The Shadow’ shifts across the square , reaching the entrance of Via del Proconsolo. Here we find, on the right, the Palace of the Bargello Museum. On the opposite side there is the splendid Badia Fiorentina, founded in 978, but restored by the famous architect Arnolfo di Cambio in 1285. The bell tower of the abbey, one of the most famous Florentine skyline, dates back to 1310 and stands up to seventy meters.

3. The Hospital of Langdon

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Although it isn’t exactly specified in the text, ‘The Shadow’ passes a hospital where Robert Langdon wakes up, battered and bruised. We are led to believe that it is most likely the New Hospital of St. John of God, found on the road that leads from Florence to the city of Scandicci.

4. La “Fontana della Forchetta”

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The Boboli Gardens, one of the wonders of Florence, are located behind the Pitti Palace. The Florentines have free access to the gardens, tourists instead are required to pay an entrance fee (€ 7, but it’s worth it). The bronze sculpture that Dan Brown is talking about dates back to 1571 and depicts Neptune in the act of spearing his prey with the trident (or “fork”, as the natives and Brown himself in the text).

5. Da viale Macchiavelli a Porta Romana

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Well, what is known as ‘the most beautiful’ city street is this avenue that is characterized by many curves and luscious the greenery. Viale Machiavelli leads to the roundabout where there is, among other things, the fourteenth-century Roman Gate ‘Porta Romana’ , the main entry point to the city in the last circle of Florence’s medieval walls. The character Robert Langdon comes right up here… but beware of the traffic. You might as well leave the car and walk around: from the windows of Porta Romana you can enjoy a beautiful view of the Boboli Gardens.

These 5 points of interest are not all that you’ll find hidden within Dan Brown’s Inferno, but they sure are a good starting point for any fan, looking to trace the steps of the characters that pass through Florence. 

Credits -Panorama Magazine 

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