Art Culture > Exhibition > 5 top art exhibitions in December that you can’t miss Date posted: November 20, 2012

5 top art exhibitions in December that you can’t miss

The art world Is wide and varied. Here are Swide’s picks of must-sees in December: London, Berlin, New York, Madrid…

Jonas Menkas

5 December – 27 January 2013

Serpentine Gallery, London

christmas-2012-exhibitions-holidays 

Lithuanian-born American filmmaker (1922), Jonas Mekas’s, work is going to be taking centre stage at the Serpentine Gallery this Christmas. Comprising of film, photography and video selected from the avant-garde artist’s prolific sixty-year career, the exhibition is a celebration of what Mekas has achieved up until this day, culminating in the premiere of his new feature length work, which is to be presented as an installation. He has worked with iconic artists such as Salvador Dali, Yoko Ono and Andy Warhol but it is the stills and portraits of friends and family that also bring this body of work to life.  It’s an opportunity not to be missed, as are the various talks and events that will be happening during its time at the Gallery.

Serpentine GalleryKensington Gardens, London W2 3XA, tel. T (+44) 020 7402 6075

The Young van Dyck

Till 3 March 2013

Prado Museum, Madrid

christmas-2012-exhibitions-holidays-Prado-Madrid 

This wonderful exhibition is set to explore the work of the famous Flemish artist, Anthony van Dyck (1599 – 1641) created before 1620, the year that he travelled from Antwerp to London, leaving the post of being Peter Paul Rubens’ main assistant. The exhibition exemplifies the immense skill that van Dyck displayed as a teenager and the effect that Rubens had on him. The work that can be found at Prado Museum is a glimpse at an artists early footings into a career which turned into a legacy.

Museo Nacional del Prado, Paseo del Prado, s/n, 28014 Madrid (Madrid), tel. +34 913302800

Paul Kos – Allegories and Metaphors

Till January 19, 2013

Vallois Galerie, Paris

christmas-2012-exhibitions-holidays-koss-paris 

This is the first time that those is Paris will get a chance to be study and experience the work of Paul Kos. Kos (1942 California) is one of the founders of the Bay Area Conceptual Art movement. The exhibition showcases works created between 1968 and today, exploring the contextual forces that play out in his work and the paradoxes that can be found in his creations. Kos is interested in the honesty of materials and a place where, ‘and in finding a place where material, play, chance and meaning can magically come together’. To find out more about this conceptual artist, head on down to the Vallois Gallery this December.

Vallois Galerie36, rue de Seine 75006 Paris, tel.+33(0)1 46 34 61 07    

Christmas Tree and Neapolitan Baroque Crèche

Till January 6, 2013

Metropolitan Museum, New York

christmas-2012-exhibitions-holidays-Metropolitan-New York 

The Museum continues a longstanding holiday tradition with the presentation of its Christmas tree, a favorite of New Yorkers and visitors from around the world. A vivid eighteenth-century Neapolitan Nativity scene—embellished with a profuse array of diminutive, lifelike figures of those from the Nativity scene and silk-robed angels hovering above—adorns the candlelit spruce.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1000 Fifth Avenue New York, New York, tel. +1-212-535-7710

Believers

Kow Gallery, Berlin

Until February 3rd

christmas-2012-exhibitions-holidays-berlin 

“The right to blasphemy should become a human right. The special right to the protection of religious sentiments, by contrast, should not. Trampling on such feelings is not a very empathetic thing to do, but the fact that they seem to be particular sensitive is not the fault of those who do not share that sensitivity”. This is the provocative intro to “Believers”, a photography exhibition that is comprised religious blasphemy and related topic. The points of view raised are as important during this season as they are throughout the year.

Kow Gallery, Brunnenstr. 9, 10119 Berlin, tel. +49 (0)30 311 66 770

By: Elisa della Barba and Ben Taylor 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Post a comment